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Are traditional publishers dying a slow death?

03 Apr

I found an article on Forbes that I thought my readers my find interesting.

(Guy Kawasaki – www.forbes.com/sites/markfidelman/2013/01/01/guy-kawasaki-to-traditional-publishers-your-days-are-numbered/):

1. Digital Rights Management (DRM) is generally detrimental to an author’s work.

Kawasaki believes that DRM constraints limit the distribution of their books. I’m not sure about that, but certainly the lack of DRM will provide more opportunities for people to read your book.

Kawasaki explains: “I focus on the joy of reading, so my advice is for authors to better monetize their IP by ensuring broad, timely, and inexpensive distribution to as much of the world as possible. Authors should trust people and not implement all sorts of heinous DRM. Life is simple: write a good book, get it out there quickly, price it reasonably, and trust your customers. ”

2. Build your personal brand before you start selling the book.

You can’t rely on publishers to promote your book anymore; Kawasaki says, it’s therefore imperative to build your own platform before the book is released. What he means is to build a network or community of people that are interested in your content. That way, when the book is released, you have thousands of people likely to buy it. That’s solid advice.

“The day you start writing is the day you should start building your brand,” Kawasaki suggests.

3. The secret for increasing an author’s odds for success are…

According to Kawasaki:One method that no one uses, though it’s hardly a secret, is to solicit feedback on your outline and your draft. I solicit feedback from literally millions of people who follow me on social media by uploading the entire outline of a book when I begin writing. Then I offer the full manuscript to anyone who wants to edit it near the end of the process. This yields two great results. First, lots of insightful feedback. Second, the moment your book is available on Amazon, people who have really read it can post reviews.”

This is a big idea – by crowdsourcing the editing of the book, you become invested in its success. You’re also more likely to buy it and recommend it to others.

4. You are your best marketing asset, but don’t forget the PR company.

For most of the book, Kawasaki and co-author Shawn Welch suggest authors need to “own the marketing” whether or not they self-published or work with a publisher.

“The lesson is that you need to conduct an introduction campaign that reaches out to hundreds of publications as well as your social-media following. I’m not suggesting firing a shotgun into the cyberspace, but there are probably 200 relevant targets for any genre. ”

5. How to navigate the Amazon

Kawasaki and Welch both believe Amazon has amassed an enormous amount of power in the publishing world: “When it comes to publishing, this is Amazon’s world, and the rest of us (readers, authors, and publishers) live in it.”

Pretty cool, huh? (Evin – http://www.mrgurupublishing.com)

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Posted by on April 3, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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